Discussion continues over density, comp plan in Greenfield

Greenfield Mayor Jerry Hertaus communicated his frustration over additional communications from the Metropolitan Council that do not acknowledge what he believed was a previous understanding of how important increased density is to the city of Greenfield and how determined the city council is to amend the current one-in-11 (acre) zoning restrictions.

This issue is one that the council is in agreement on, citing that current guiding puts amenities like city sewer fiscally out of the city’s grasp for several decades by impeding the development needed to support it.

Resident Chuck Alcon addressed the council with several points he said further support the need to go from duo zoning to a singular, higher density citywide.

He charged the council with moving aggressively to this end and cited three major considerations in doing so: forfeiture (the city and land owners are unable to benefit under the restrictions) authority (the city’s officials must have the ability to plan strategically and in the best interests of the city rather than allowing an outside authority unchecked power in this regard), equality (it’s unfair to holders of large parcels who are unable to realize the financial potential of their properties for an undetermined number of years).

There was no action taken in regard to this matter.

 

PARK ADVISORY

The city established a park advisory in 2011 to begin planning for the parkland at County Rd. 50 and Town Hall Drive.

The one-year commitment for that committee has expired, and the council would like to move forward with a 5-member advisory. Three of the previous nine members were named to the park advisory with staggered one and two year terms, and the council is seeking and additional two.

Discussion regarding representation with the RACE committee resulted from a presentation earlier in the meeting by RACE representatives explaining how grant dollars will be used to improve a softball (four field) pinwheel at the Rockford High School.

RACE (Rockford Area Collaborative effort) consists of representatives from the Rockford School District, the cities of Rockford, Corcoran and, recently, Greenfield, and associated athletic support organizations who work toward securing grant dollars to build, or improve, area fields and athletic related sights.

The council will further discuss and give the advisory direction on this matter.

 

GREENFIELD HISTORY

BUFFS WANTED

In other news, the Greenfield Historical Society asked that it be allowed to partner with the city to better position itself in obtaining a grant.

The group, in a letter to the council, stated that it has plans to record oral histories of longtime residents with the intention of producing a written record, hiring the director of the Rockford Area Historical Society, Rebecca Mavencamp, who is also a freelance journalist and has agreed to participate in the project.

The council voted unanimously to support the grant application as proposed by the Greenfield Historical Society. Some new members were recruited on the spot, but the society would like to encourage area residents who are interested in the city’s history, or who have information to share, to consider joining.

The next regular meeting of the Greenfield City Council is Tuesday, Aug. 7, at 7 p.m. at 6390 Town Hall Drive.

  • KJ

    Can someone explain the zoning rule: current one-in-11 (acre) zoning restrictions??

    • JL

      Hi KJ,
      If you look at a zoning map of Greenfield you will see that the city has different classifications for land use. Much of the south one third of the city is zoned rural residential. The density for home sites in this area is 1 home per 6 acres. Most of the north area is still zoned agricultural. The density in this area of the city is 1 home per 11 acres. When you combine these two areas the city is currently required to have a maximum average of 1 home site per 10 acres. There are other classifications of land use such as residential town home, sewered residential, commercial/industrial. These would not be part of the current 1 home site per 10 acre configuration. If you had 9 acres in a 1 in 6 rural residential area, you could theoretically have as little as 2 1/2 acres for your current home site, and then the remaining 6 1/2 acres, if conditions are met, could be another home site. The city would like those areas to be changed to a 1 home site per 5 acres average throughout. I hope that I helped.
      J.L.

up arrow