Press and News http://pressnews.com Sun, 30 Aug 2015 18:41:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Rebels stun No. 1 Prior Lake in volleyball opener http://pressnews.com/2015/08/30/rebels-stun-no-1-prior-lake-in-volleyball-opener/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/30/rebels-stun-no-1-prior-lake-in-volleyball-opener/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 17:00:32 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144241 Champlin Park volleyball players celebrate in their 3-2 victory over No. 1-ranked Prior Lake on Saturday night in Hopkins. (Photo by Shari Crymble)
Champlin Park volleyball players celebrate in their 3-2 victory over No. 1-ranked Prior Lake on Saturday night in Hopkins. (Photo by Shari Crymble)

Champlin Park opened their volleyball season with a statement on Saturday night in Hopkins.

Ranked No. 8 in Class AAA, the Rebels rallied to beat No. 1-ranked Class AAA Prior Lake 3-2 in the Sideout Classic. At first, things looked daunting for Champlin Park when they lost for the first two sets 25-22 and 25-21. Moreover, the Rebels lost their fifth-straight set overall in the annual showcase going back to last year.

A higher-ranked Roseville team swept the Rebels in 2014 at the same event 3-0. Nonetheless, the Rebels flipped the script this time around behind stellar play from Sydney Hilley and Jenae Alderson.

Jenae Alderson had 15 kills for Champlin Park. (Photo by Shari Crymble)
Jenae Alderson had 15 kills for Champlin Park. (Photo by Shari Crymble)

Hilley, a Wisconsin recruit, led the team with 17 kills, 15 digs and five service aces. Alderson had 15 kills, 14 digs and two aces.

Champlin Park took sets three and four 25-22 and 25-23 respectively. The Rebels then pulled off the final set 16-14 for the upset.

Next, Champlin Park will begin Northwest Suburban Conference play on Tuesday with a trip to Andover at 7 p.m.

Read more in this week’s edition of the Sun Post

Contact Matthew Davis at matthew.davis@ecm-inc.com ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/30/rebels-stun-no-1-prior-lake-in-volleyball-opener/feed/ 0 Former Viking Coleman to speak at Osseo Community Prayer Breakfast http://pressnews.com/2015/08/30/former-viking-coleman-to-speak-at-osseo-community-prayer-breakfast/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/30/former-viking-coleman-to-speak-at-osseo-community-prayer-breakfast/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 09:52:21 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144066 Former Minnesota Viking Greg Coleman will be the guest speaker at the Thursday, Sept. 24, Osseo Community Prayer Breakfast.

The event is from 7 to 8:30 a.m. at the Osseo American Legion Hall, 260 Fourth Ave. S.E. in Osseo.

Osseo acting mayor Dr. Mark Schulz will welcome all area residents, business leaders, government and education officials and area churches to this sixth annual event to enjoy and share Osseo’s special place in the metro area.

“Empowering Life” is the theme this year for the buffet breakfast and program.

A portion of proceeds from this year’s event again will benefit Avenues for Youth, an organization working to develop a safe shelter for homeless teens in Brooklyn Park.

Prayer Breakfast Sponsorship tables (each table seating 10) are available until Sept. 14 by calling Osseo United Methodist Church at 763-425-2923. Individual $15 tickets are available until Tuesday, Sept. 22, by calling the church 763-425-2923.

Osseo Community Prayer Breakfast is an event organized in 2010 that brings together local men and women from government, business, education and religion to acknowledge God’s protection and guidance over the community.

Coleman spent 10 of his 12 years in the National football League with the Minnesota Vikings.

A popular motivational speaker in the Twin Cities area, Coleman is an ordained minister who, with his wife Eleanor, facilitates marriage education seminars. He is founder of the “Touch From Him Ministries” in Minneapolis.

He is the founder of the Greg Coleman Celebrity Golf Tournament benefitting the University YMCA’s Y-Tutors program. The event benefits Twin Cities area students with after-school tutoring.

He is a co-founder of the Pepsi Minority Golf Tournament in his hometown of Jacksonville, Fla., offering college scholarships to students.

Coleman serves as a sidelines analyst for the Minnesota Vikings Radio Network on KFAN 11:30 AM during the NFL season. He also is chairman of the Minnesota Vikings Alumni Association and is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

A graduate of William M. Raines High School in Jacksonville, he is a 1976 graduate of Florida A & M University.

He has the honor of being the first African American punter in the NFL and was selected by fans to be a member of he Vikings 40th Anniversary team. ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/30/former-viking-coleman-to-speak-at-osseo-community-prayer-breakfast/feed/ 0 Collecting backpacks, school supplies for CROSS http://pressnews.com/2015/08/29/collecting-backpacks-school-supplies-for-cross/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/29/collecting-backpacks-school-supplies-for-cross/#comments Sat, 29 Aug 2015 09:49:03 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144058 CROSSwurthAdamsTo help local families prepare for the upcoming school year, Wurth Adams employees collected and donated 81 pounds of new backpacks and school supplies to CROSS Services. Employees at the Maple Grove business, such as (left to right) Jessica Wahlberg, Bri Kern and Becca Reitan-Humayun, have been collecting and donating new backpacks and school supplies to CROSS for more than five years. CROSS Services is a non-profit organization serving families and individuals living in Rogers, Maple Grove, Osseo, Champlin (west), Corcoran and Dayton. CROSS thanks the many businesses, religious organizations, individuals and organizations for the new donated backpacks and schools supplies. Around 800 local children will receive back to school assistance before the beginning of the new school year. For more information about CROSS Services, visit CROSSservices.org or call 763-425-1050. (Photo provided by Wurth Adams)

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Champlin Park bends, breaks Centennial’s heart http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/champlin-park-bends-breaks-centennials-heart/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/champlin-park-bends-breaks-centennials-heart/#comments Sat, 29 Aug 2015 04:40:56 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144238 p103spchampfb chad costello
Champlin Park’s Chad Costello scrambles in the Rebels’ 25-21 victory over Centennial on Friday night. (Sun Press staff photo by Matthew Davis)

While Champlin Park showed significant improvements from week one of the football season on Friday night at Centennial, the Rebels’ secondary in particular made big strides when it counted most.

The Rebels gave up long pass plays throughout, including ones that set up scores by the Cougars. However, Champlin Park’s ‘bend but don’t break’ mentality prevailed on one key pass play.

DeAnte Bronson picked off a pass for the Rebels that at first had touchdown written all over it for Centennial. Bronson ultimately preserved a 25-21 road victory in a venue that had not been a kind place for the Rebels.

“We’ve lost here the past two years, and last year was by a point,” Rebels coach Mike Korton said.

Champlin Park came in Friday and doubled their point total from week one in the first half alone with a 12-7 lead. Centennial pulled ahead in the second half on a touchdown drive, which began a series trading TDs between the two West Metro District rivals.

Olando Gbarbea put Champlin Park ahead to stay on a 94-yard kick-off return for a TD in the fourth quarter, 25-21. Eldridge Joyce caught three TDs in an improved passing attack as the Rebels put 219 yards through the air.

Champlin Park (1-1) bounced back from an 8-6 loss to Minnetonka on Aug. 22 with Friday’s win. The Rebels will host Coon Rapids at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 3.

Read more in the Sept. 3 edition of the Champlin Dayton Press

Contact Matthew Davis at matthew.davis@ecm-inc.com ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/champlin-park-bends-breaks-centennials-heart/feed/ 0 Column: Do black lives matter? Absolutely! See you at the Fair http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/column-do-black-lives-matter-absolutely-see-you-at-the-fair/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/column-do-black-lives-matter-absolutely-see-you-at-the-fair/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 21:56:52 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144234 We’ve had this back-and-forth conversation. Do black lives matter? The organization Black Lives Matter is planning a rather controversial protest at Saturday’s Minnesota State Fair.

Some have said that protest is inappropriate. If individuals feel State Fair management has discriminated against them, they should first directly approach the fair’s leadership and present their case. I agree.

I’ve attended the Minnesota State Fair countless times over six decades. I recall being scared by the haunted house as a kid. I remember how incredible it was to ride the sky ride over the heads of fellow fair-goers. I remember the thrill of being in “The Cities” instead of dull, boring farm country.

We missed a chunk of years somewhere, but we have been faithful fairgoers again the last 15 years or so. I love the flowers in the horticulture building, the music at the Leinie Lodge and the food at the International Village. And yes we’ve enjoyed a beer (or two) at the Minnesota brewers exhibit.

I’ve seen a great diversity at the fair each year. I see people of all ages, shapes, sizes and colors. I see all types of dress — a predominance of Twins t-shirts and Pioneer seed corn caps for sure — but a good representation of saris, burkas and hijabs. (However, someone will have to explain to me how a person can traverse the fairgrounds in flip-flops!)

I also don’t see any reason why Black Lives Matter — or any other Minnesota political group — couldn’t stage a protest at the Fair. We are all entitled to free speech and the freedom to assemble.

We have several other groups that might be appropriate for protests this year. How about resort owners around Mille Lacs whose livelihood became a political football?

How about farmers who are threatened each day by new regulations, such as water protection rules? Meeting the requirements becomes more and more costly at a time where commodity prices are falling.

And how about Minnesota’s 18-year-olds, facing college costs that could force them into debt that will take them a decade or two to repay?

Our State Fair is an occasion to enjoy, to savor and to over-indulge. (Are you going to try deep fried olives wrapped in bacon? I just might.)

The Fair has been the scene of political debates over the years. Just how many state politicians will be there this year? I would venture the answer is, “All of them.”

I will be at the fair Wednesday or Thursday. If I pass by the Black Lives Matter booth, I will hope they will be open to a high five from me (apologies for the greasy fingers if I just visited the mini-donuts stand).

Yes, black lives matter, as do all lives. Our State Fair is the 10 days of the year where we are all together, where are all alike: Tired feet, carrying our yard sticks, trying not to sit down on someone’s discarded cotton candy.

Our great get-together is where we affirm that all Minnesotan lives matter.

See you at the Fair?

Reactions to this column and all commentaries on our websites and in our publications are welcome: peggy.bakken@ecm-inc.com ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/column-do-black-lives-matter-absolutely-see-you-at-the-fair/feed/ 0 Thinking Through a Legacy http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/thinking-through-a-legacy/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/thinking-through-a-legacy/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 19:32:54 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?guid=ec77a241366bacd3b8784b607334b8a5 When you say, “I want to leave a legacy,” what do you mean? Is legacy about money, possessions, memories, spirituality, meaning, love, circles unbroken, the lives of loved ones and fellow humans who are better off because you were here ... what?

There were consequence when you were born, consequences based on how you live your life and there will be consequences when you die. It’s easy to be confused by complexities involving finances, accounting, taxation and legal issues.

As such things can be mind numbing, you can easily are put them off. But as my friend, estate planning and tax lawyer John J. “Jeff” Scroggin of Roswell, Ga., explains, the real starting point is people.

Start with the people in your life important to you. How will your death impact your spouse, parent, adult or minor child, other loved ones, business partners or associates? If you were incapacitated prior to death, how would that affect those in your life? Money and possessions are just part of the equation. Ditto a closely held business or other venture.

Your conversations with advisors should revolve around people who depend on you and look up to you. What are their goals and needs? What should they know when they get the phone call that you are incapacitated, unable to communicate or act in your own behalf or deceased? Based on in-depth conversations, advisors can wrestle with legalisms, tax, financial and accounting issues.

For most people, with proper planning, estate taxes are not a concern. In 2015, estate, gift, and generation skipping federal tax exemptions are pegged at $5.43 million, with inflation-based increases going forward. Done right, couples can pass twice the exemption to heirs, $10.86 million free of federal estate tax. Death benefits from life insurance, owned by an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT), can pass to heirs free of income and estate taxes. Here, you transfer assets from your estate to this trust.

Wealthy individuals and couples, especially those with farms, closely held business or other non-liquid highly value assets, should review their goals and objectives. Have you had assets valued lately?

The Obama administration is attacking tax-saving estate planning techniques.  The Internal Revenue Service is poised to issue a new rules on how family limited partnerships – and other such vehicles that hold businesses, real estate and other assets – value them. The agency believes that wealthy people under-value some of these assets to minimize the estate tax bite on them.

In light of all that, you are wise to consult a tax counsel.  

An up-to-date will is basic. Some of you don’t have a will, or it is old and outdated, or you or your loved ones can’t find it. A will only works when you are dead. What about incapacity? Do you have a power of attorney – giving someone you designate the authority to act for you if you cannot – for assets and health care? A medical directive, which governs your wishes concerning your own care?

Does your designated loved one or successor designee have copies? Do they know your advisors? Where are key insurance, asset, estate and family documents? Are you entitled to veteran’s benefits? Where are your service records?

A will is only part of the estate settlement equation. Beneficiary designations also direct the distribution of assets. Have you reviewed those to ensure that primary and contingent beneficiaries are up-to-date and still reflect your wishes?

How property is titled dictates distribution, as well as potential income or estate taxation. Advisors need to know the nature of property, how it is titled, its value and tax basis (what you originally paid for it, used to calculate capital gains tax once you sell). Strategies exist that potentially may lower gains taxes, even if you do not have estate tax exposure.

Trust planning often makes sense regarding retirement accounts and assets that could pass to minors, incapacitated or special needs children or adults, or adult children with substance abuse or spendthrift challenges. Real estate owned outside of your state of residence needs attention.

Texas televangelist Mike Murdock, known for promoting prosperity theology –which holds that faith and good works can lead to financial success – posits that legacy goes beyond issues of money and possessions: “You will only be remembered for two things: the problems you solve or the ones you create.”

Planning for incapacity and your ultimate death, while not fun to contemplate, provides clarity and comfort for loved ones at a time of confusion and sadness. Beyond what you leave behind, the real point is your eternal inheritance. James Dobson, evangelist and head of Focus On The Family, declares, “My legacy doesn't matter. It isn't important that I be remembered. It's important that when I stand before the Lord, he says, 'Well done, good and faithful servant.' I want to finish strong.”

Finish strong, in love and with peace of mind.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Lewis Walker, CFP, is president of Walker Capital Management, LCC in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Securities and certain advisory services offered through The Strategic Financial Alliance Inc. (SFA). Lewis Walker and Mike Hostetler are registered representatives of the SFA, which is otherwise unaffiliated with Walker Capital Management. 770-441-2603. lewisw@theinvestmentcoach.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

 

 

 

              

 

 

]]> When you say, “I want to leave a legacy,” what do you mean? Is legacy about money, possessions, memories, spirituality, meaning, love, circles unbroken, the lives of loved ones and fellow humans who are better off because you were here ... what?

There were consequence when you were born, consequences based on how you live your life and there will be consequences when you die. It’s easy to be confused by complexities involving finances, accounting, taxation and legal issues.

As such things can be mind numbing, you can easily are put them off. But as my friend, estate planning and tax lawyer John J. “Jeff” Scroggin of Roswell, Ga., explains, the real starting point is people.

Start with the people in your life important to you. How will your death impact your spouse, parent, adult or minor child, other loved ones, business partners or associates? If you were incapacitated prior to death, how would that affect those in your life? Money and possessions are just part of the equation. Ditto a closely held business or other venture.

Your conversations with advisors should revolve around people who depend on you and look up to you. What are their goals and needs? What should they know when they get the phone call that you are incapacitated, unable to communicate or act in your own behalf or deceased? Based on in-depth conversations, advisors can wrestle with legalisms, tax, financial and accounting issues.

For most people, with proper planning, estate taxes are not a concern. In 2015, estate, gift, and generation skipping federal tax exemptions are pegged at $5.43 million, with inflation-based increases going forward. Done right, couples can pass twice the exemption to heirs, $10.86 million free of federal estate tax. Death benefits from life insurance, owned by an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT), can pass to heirs free of income and estate taxes. Here, you transfer assets from your estate to this trust.

Wealthy individuals and couples, especially those with farms, closely held business or other non-liquid highly value assets, should review their goals and objectives. Have you had assets valued lately?

The Obama administration is attacking tax-saving estate planning techniques.  The Internal Revenue Service is poised to issue a new rules on how family limited partnerships – and other such vehicles that hold businesses, real estate and other assets – value them. The agency believes that wealthy people under-value some of these assets to minimize the estate tax bite on them.

In light of all that, you are wise to consult a tax counsel.  

An up-to-date will is basic. Some of you don’t have a will, or it is old and outdated, or you or your loved ones can’t find it. A will only works when you are dead. What about incapacity? Do you have a power of attorney – giving someone you designate the authority to act for you if you cannot – for assets and health care? A medical directive, which governs your wishes concerning your own care?

Does your designated loved one or successor designee have copies? Do they know your advisors? Where are key insurance, asset, estate and family documents? Are you entitled to veteran’s benefits? Where are your service records?

A will is only part of the estate settlement equation. Beneficiary designations also direct the distribution of assets. Have you reviewed those to ensure that primary and contingent beneficiaries are up-to-date and still reflect your wishes?

How property is titled dictates distribution, as well as potential income or estate taxation. Advisors need to know the nature of property, how it is titled, its value and tax basis (what you originally paid for it, used to calculate capital gains tax once you sell). Strategies exist that potentially may lower gains taxes, even if you do not have estate tax exposure.

Trust planning often makes sense regarding retirement accounts and assets that could pass to minors, incapacitated or special needs children or adults, or adult children with substance abuse or spendthrift challenges. Real estate owned outside of your state of residence needs attention.

Texas televangelist Mike Murdock, known for promoting prosperity theology –which holds that faith and good works can lead to financial success – posits that legacy goes beyond issues of money and possessions: “You will only be remembered for two things: the problems you solve or the ones you create.”

Planning for incapacity and your ultimate death, while not fun to contemplate, provides clarity and comfort for loved ones at a time of confusion and sadness. Beyond what you leave behind, the real point is your eternal inheritance. James Dobson, evangelist and head of Focus On The Family, declares, “My legacy doesn't matter. It isn't important that I be remembered. It's important that when I stand before the Lord, he says, 'Well done, good and faithful servant.' I want to finish strong.”

Finish strong, in love and with peace of mind.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Lewis Walker, CFP, is president of Walker Capital Management, LCC in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Securities and certain advisory services offered through The Strategic Financial Alliance Inc. (SFA). Lewis Walker and Mike Hostetler are registered representatives of the SFA, which is otherwise unaffiliated with Walker Capital Management. 770-441-2603. lewisw@theinvestmentcoach.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

 

 

 

              

 

 

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STMA to celebrate staff anniversaries http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/stma-to-celebrate-staff-anniversaries/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/stma-to-celebrate-staff-anniversaries/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 15:00:30 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144149 The St. Michael-Albertville School District has an impressive list of employees with 10 or more years of experience, and each will be honored at a staff meeting Wednesday, Sept. 2.

Topping the list is longtime high school teacher Daryl Skogen, who is celebrating his 40th year at STMA. Another stalwart STMA persona, high school teacher Gregg Greeno (wrestling hall of fame coach), is celebrating his 35th year, along with middle school teacher Jill Gehl.

Others being recognized include: 30 years — elementary school teacher and varsity boys basketball coach Tim Anfenson, Albertville Primary School teacher Jane Coulson, and middle school teacher Susan Zachman.

Those with 20 years include elementary teacher Gayle Dahlke, middle school media specialist Sandi Ferris, elementary teacher Aaron Heil, elementary teacher Paul Schumm, elementary teacher Allen Smith, middle school teacher Jill Krone, and high school paraprofessional Joan Gindele.

Also, 57 people are being recognized for 10 years of service. ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/stma-to-celebrate-staff-anniversaries/feed/ 0 Stocks’ Woes: Blame Dollar, Oil http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/stocks-woes-blame-dollar-oil/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/stocks-woes-blame-dollar-oil/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:03:07 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?guid=b00464aaf157bc4b3ca270306415c2fb Stocks, which neared record levels until their recent retreat, have been flat for much of this year. A host of international worries get trotted out as the reason, but the strong dollar and declining oil prices are at the root of the plateau and then the dip. 

Since about Thanksgiving of last year, the Standard & Poor’s 500 has traded in a relatively narrow range. This corresponds with the end of the Federal Reserve’s stimulus program – buying bonds to hold down interest rates, known as quantitative easing. Other things have obviously come into play: Greece’s woes, the threat of rising U.S. interest rates, weak earnings, China’s weakening economic performance, etc. 

Still, the dollar’s strong rally, as the best refuge in a wobbly world, has hobbled American corporate performance, and investors respond with lower stock prices. The U.S. Dollar Index has climbed 17% over the past 12 months.

Interestingly, many multinational companies have actually sold more goods and services versus a year ago, but revenue was slightly down in 2015’s second quarter, as a result of the dollar’s strength. When foreign sales are repatriated to American soil, the currency exchange shrinks them.

Much of the strengthening of the dollar was over during the fourth quarter of last year. So by the time we get to earnings for this year’s fourth quarter, the comparisons should be more favorable, assuming the dollar stays close to where it is today against most of the major currencies. This might catch some investors by surprise.

The dollar right now seems invulnerable. It has thwarted Standard & Poor’s, which took unparalleled action to downgrade the U.S.’s rating in early August 2011. One would have expected the rating agency’s move to cause U.S. interest rates to go up.  After all, if a bond is more risky, investors require more interest. 

That didn’t happen, though, because of the perceived safety of American government debt – denominated, of course, in dollars. Foreign investors piling into it helped send the greenback ever higher. The 10-year Treasury yield has fallen to 2.17% from 2.57%, and it has even been much lower during that period. (Bond yields move in the opposite direction from prices.) When the market slumped last week, investors, many of them foreign, crowded into dollar-denominated Treasuries.

Typically, lowering a country’s rating normally dampens its economy, or at least is a red flag that a downturn is coming. Our nation, however, has continued to grow its economy, albeit slowly, and the S&P 500 has gained about 80% since the downgrade.

On March 28, 2013, the S&P 500 closed at 1569, surpassing the pre-Great Recession high of 1565 set on Oct. 9, 2007.  Since that time, the S&P 500 has gone on to set an additional 107 record closes or one every 5½ days. 

But big rallies get tired, and the soaring dollar’s muting of corporate returns is taking a toll on investor confidence lately. Now, events that the market used to shrug off get a grim investor reception. China’s devaluation of its currency, for instance, rattled stock markets worldwide. One reason to devalue was to spur Chinese exports by making them cheaper against – you guessed it – the dollar.

Meanwhile, slumping oil stocks are an albatross for the entire market. S&P oil stocks are off 12% thus far this year, the worst sector in the index. After July’s 17% decline in the price of oil, we now find oil just above $40 a barrel and with no real prospect of rising any time soon by a meaningful amount.

In fact, it's entirely possible that oil could decline another $4 to $7 a barrel by the time this summer’s driving season is over. The slower growth in China coupled with the prospect of Iranian oil coming on the market, should the President Barack Obama’s Iranian nuclear deal become reality, certainly adds to the depressed market.

There is little doubt that, as the world's economy continues to improve over the next few years, oil prices will rise, but it may be a long time before they get back to over $100 a barrel.

Our firm believes stocks likely will move up this fall and winter. For now, the twin weights of the dollar and oil make for a tepid performance, at best.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

V. Raymond Ferrara, CFP, CSA, is chairman and chief executive officer of ProVise Management Group LLC in Clearwater, Fla. 

This material represents an assessment of the market and economic environment at a specific point in time. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions, the contents may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. It is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties. Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

]]> Stocks, which neared record levels until their recent retreat, have been flat for much of this year. A host of international worries get trotted out as the reason, but the strong dollar and declining oil prices are at the root of the plateau and then the dip. 

Since about Thanksgiving of last year, the Standard & Poor’s 500 has traded in a relatively narrow range. This corresponds with the end of the Federal Reserve’s stimulus program – buying bonds to hold down interest rates, known as quantitative easing. Other things have obviously come into play: Greece’s woes, the threat of rising U.S. interest rates, weak earnings, China’s weakening economic performance, etc. 

Still, the dollar’s strong rally, as the best refuge in a wobbly world, has hobbled American corporate performance, and investors respond with lower stock prices. The U.S. Dollar Index has climbed 17% over the past 12 months.

Interestingly, many multinational companies have actually sold more goods and services versus a year ago, but revenue was slightly down in 2015’s second quarter, as a result of the dollar’s strength. When foreign sales are repatriated to American soil, the currency exchange shrinks them.

Much of the strengthening of the dollar was over during the fourth quarter of last year. So by the time we get to earnings for this year’s fourth quarter, the comparisons should be more favorable, assuming the dollar stays close to where it is today against most of the major currencies. This might catch some investors by surprise.

The dollar right now seems invulnerable. It has thwarted Standard & Poor’s, which took unparalleled action to downgrade the U.S.’s rating in early August 2011. One would have expected the rating agency’s move to cause U.S. interest rates to go up.  After all, if a bond is more risky, investors require more interest. 

That didn’t happen, though, because of the perceived safety of American government debt – denominated, of course, in dollars. Foreign investors piling into it helped send the greenback ever higher. The 10-year Treasury yield has fallen to 2.17% from 2.57%, and it has even been much lower during that period. (Bond yields move in the opposite direction from prices.) When the market slumped last week, investors, many of them foreign, crowded into dollar-denominated Treasuries.

Typically, lowering a country’s rating normally dampens its economy, or at least is a red flag that a downturn is coming. Our nation, however, has continued to grow its economy, albeit slowly, and the S&P 500 has gained about 80% since the downgrade.

On March 28, 2013, the S&P 500 closed at 1569, surpassing the pre-Great Recession high of 1565 set on Oct. 9, 2007.  Since that time, the S&P 500 has gone on to set an additional 107 record closes or one every 5½ days. 

But big rallies get tired, and the soaring dollar’s muting of corporate returns is taking a toll on investor confidence lately. Now, events that the market used to shrug off get a grim investor reception. China’s devaluation of its currency, for instance, rattled stock markets worldwide. One reason to devalue was to spur Chinese exports by making them cheaper against – you guessed it – the dollar.

Meanwhile, slumping oil stocks are an albatross for the entire market. S&P oil stocks are off 12% thus far this year, the worst sector in the index. After July’s 17% decline in the price of oil, we now find oil just above $40 a barrel and with no real prospect of rising any time soon by a meaningful amount.

In fact, it's entirely possible that oil could decline another $4 to $7 a barrel by the time this summer’s driving season is over. The slower growth in China coupled with the prospect of Iranian oil coming on the market, should the President Barack Obama’s Iranian nuclear deal become reality, certainly adds to the depressed market.

There is little doubt that, as the world's economy continues to improve over the next few years, oil prices will rise, but it may be a long time before they get back to over $100 a barrel.

Our firm believes stocks likely will move up this fall and winter. For now, the twin weights of the dollar and oil make for a tepid performance, at best.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

V. Raymond Ferrara, CFP, CSA, is chairman and chief executive officer of ProVise Management Group LLC in Clearwater, Fla. 

This material represents an assessment of the market and economic environment at a specific point in time. Due to various factors, including changing market conditions, the contents may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. It is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties. Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

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Law Enforcement Explorer Post 3775 begins new season http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/law-enforcement-explorer-post-3775-begins-new-season-2/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/law-enforcement-explorer-post-3775-begins-new-season-2/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 09:57:25 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144076 Maple Grove Explorer’s ‘First Nighter’ is Sept. 14

After another successful season, the Maple Grove Law Enforcement Explorer Post is eager to begin a new year. The Explorers are a group of young men and women between the ages of 14 to 20 who have chosen to “explore” a career in law enforcement and the criminal justice profession. Anyone from the ages previously mentioned and has completed eighth grade are invited to attend.

Explorers are trained in all areas of modern policing including: search and arrest, domestic crisis intervention, bomb threat response, traffic accident investigation, hostage negotiation, among many other topics.

The Explorer Post meets every Monday night for training conducted by officers of the Maple Grove Police Department and other law enforcement agencies.

Explorers will also have the option to participate in the ride-along program. Explorers will ride with a police officer to compare how their training can be applied in real world.

To begin the new season, the Maple Grove Explorers will host its “First Nighter” Monday, Sept. 14, at 7 p.m at the North Metro Range, 11370 89th Ave. in Maple Grove. At this meeting, interested young men and women and their parents will learn exactly what the program is all about. There will be presentations by Maple Grove Police Officers and Explorers to explain the program and how it can be beneficial to student’s futures.

Any inquiries can be emailed at policeexplorers@maplegrovemn.gov. ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/law-enforcement-explorer-post-3775-begins-new-season-2/feed/ 0 Maple Grove Police http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/maple-grove-police-153/ http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/maple-grove-police-153/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 09:47:54 +0000 http://pressnews.com/?p=144054 The following is a synopsis of some of the incidents that occurred in the city during the week of Aug. 7, 2015 through Aug. 13. Refer to the city website Crime Mapping Section for additional details for the crimes of burglary, robbery, arson, theft and vehicle theft.

Friday, Aug. 7

7800 block of Vinewood Lane — There was a report of person leaving a business without paying bill for food. Officers located suspect in his vehicle. Benjamin Riechert, 31, of Spring Grove, Ill. was arrested for theft.

Ronald Jacobs, 48, of Maple Grove was cited for second degree DUI refusal to submit to test, second degree DWI driving while impaired-criminal penalty and careless driving at I-94 and Weaver Lake Road.

Saturday, Aug. 8

17000 block of 96th Avenue — There was a report of a vehicle stolen from the area. Reporting party had keys and vehicle was locked. Officer’s learned that the vehicle was parked illegally and was towed by management.

10000 block of Valley Forge Lane — There was a report of juveniles throwing eggs at passing vehicles. Officers located all four suspects who were cited for curfew violation. No damage to property reported.

15000 block of Territorial Road — There was a report of someone entering a horse pasture and stealing an expensive blanket off a horse. No suspect or evidence to follow up on.

400 block of Eagle Lake Drive — There was a report of a person tripping and striking head and cutting forehead. On arrival, the bleeding had stopped and officers were cleared by paramedics when they arrived.

7300 block of Rosewood Lane — There was a report of loud music at a residence. On arrival officers observed numerous people and a DJ playing loud music. Renter was cited for ordinance violation as they had been warned previous.

Olivia Fahey, 22, of Spring Lake Park was cited for fourth degree DUI alcohol concentration over .08 and careless driving at Elm Creek Boulevard and Kilmer Lane N.

Sunday, Aug. 9

13000 block of 74th Avenue — There was a report of a person having a diabetic issue. On arrival the person was very pale and sweaty and found to have sugar level of 41. Person was given juice and officers were cleared on paramedic’s arrival.

10000 block of 97th Place — There was a report of a home being hit by lightening and smoke in the garage. On officers arrival found lightening hit ground and caused a crack in gas line. Officers cleared by fire chief.

7000 block of Main Street — There was a report of a chemical in the air inside a restaurant that made people cough uncontrollably and had itchy/irritated eyes. Officers learned of a similar incident in a different city where juveniles sprayed pepper spray inside of a business. No suspects at this time for Maple Grove case.

Teresa Schrupp, 22, of Buffalo was cited for fifth degree possession of marijuana, fifth degree possession of methamphetamine and fifth degree felony possession on the 9400 block of Dunkirk Lane N.

Jonathan Hareid, 18, of Buffalo was cited for fifth degree possession of marijuana, fifth degree possession of methamphetamine and fifth degree felony possession on the 9400 block of Dunkirk Lane N.

Monday, Aug. 10

6300 block of Vinewood Lane — There was a report of juveniles not paying a bill at a restaurant and taking off running. Juveniles were located and investigation revealed that juveniles had stolen bikes from garages in the area. Arrest was made.

Tuesday, Aug. 11

100 block of West Eagle Lake Drive — There was a report of someone spray painting the glass on the front of a storm door with graffiti at a residence. No suspects at this time.

9000 block of Underwood Lane — There was a report of a person having difficulty breathing. On arrival officers provided oxygen, which helped and then assisted to ambulance for transport.

Wednesday, Aug. 12

9800 block of Hospital Drive —There was a report of items being stolen out of purses of employees at a business. Officers learned that several different incidents have happened and no suspects have been developed. Case is currently being investigated.

Other

During this time period there were 28 property damage traffic accidents and two property damage injury traffic accidents.

Fadi Abraham, 22, of Columbia Heights was cited Aug. 3 for shoplifting and possessing or receiving stolen property on the 8000 block of Wedgewood Lane N.

Darius Weah, 20, of Brooklyn Park was cited Aug. 3 for shoplifting and possessing or receiving stolen property on the 8000 block of Wedgewood Lane N.

Charles Sworr, 21, of Coon Rapids was cited Aug. 3 for shoplifting and possessing or receiving stolen property on the 8000 block of Wedgewood Lane N.

Shawanda Hill, 40, of Maple Grove was cited Aug. 3 for domestic assault on the 13800 block of 84th Place N.

Kristina Simonson, 36, of Duluth was cited Aug. 3 for shoplifting and trespass notice served on the 12200 block of Elm Creek Blvd. N.

Jacob Nelson, 29, of Maple Grove was cited Aug. 3 for domestic assault charges on the 9300 block of Ranchview Lane N.

Courtney Leak, 34, of Brooklyn Center was cited Aug. 4 for failure to transfer title, driving after revocation and giving false name to a police officer at Eagle Lake Drive and Orleans Lane.

Kyle Hagberg, 23, of Champlin was cited Aug. 4 for theft and trespass noticed served on the 11300 block of Fountains Drive N.

Daudi Orama, 53, of Brooklyn Park was cited Aug. 4 for second degree DUI refusal to submit to test, driving after cancelation and four the degree assault to a police officer at Weaver Lake Road and Zachary Lane.

Danielle McCoy-Spencer, 18, of Plymouth was cited Aug. 4 for theft and trespass notice served on the 13600 block of Grove Drive N.

Roberto Pliego, 18, of St. Louis Park was cited Aug. 5 for shoplifting and trespass notice served on the 12700 block of Elm Creek Blvd. N.

Gavin Bothwell, 19, of Brooklyn Park was cited Aug. 5 for shoplifting and trespass notice served on the 12700 block of Elm Creek Blvd. N.

Alex Rushing, 18, of Maple Grove was cited Aug. 5 for underage liquor consumption on the 8800 block of Comstock Court N.

Justin Ekiyor, 18, of Brooklyn Park was cited Aug. 5 for underage liquor consumption on the 8800 block of Comstock Court N.

Austyn McArthur, 18, of Lino Lakes was cited Aug. 5 for underage liquor consumption on the 8800 block of Comstock Court N.

Ariel Lebebre, 23, of Maple Grove was cited Aug. 6 for shoplifting and trespass notice served on the 12200 block of Elm Creek Blvd. N. ]]> http://pressnews.com/2015/08/28/maple-grove-police-153/feed/ 0