Rogers author pens book about teen struggling with mental illness

Author Mike Gesellchen of Rogers admits a “lifelong fascination with spirituality, inner growth, and what might exist beyond the physical world.” That theme is at the forefront of his latest book, third and final book to the “Resurrectionist Trilogy entitled; The Resurrectionist Book III: The Great Tribulation.”
Author Mike Gesellchen of Rogers admits a “lifelong fascination with spirituality, inner growth, and what might exist beyond the physical world.” That theme is at the forefront of his latest book, third and final book to the “Resurrectionist Trilogy entitled; The Resurrectionist Book III: The Great Tribulation.”

Author Mike Gesellchen of Rogers admits a “lifelong fascination with spirituality, inner growth, and what might exist beyond the physical world.”

That theme is at the forefront of his latest book, the third and final book to the “Resurrectionist Trilogy entitled; The Resurrectionist Book III: The Great Tribulation.”

“I started writing ‘The Resurrectionist’ in 2004, working off and on until 2009,” Gesellchen said. “I didn’t touch it again until 2012 when I became a stay-at-home dad and began the rewriting and editing process, completing in 2014.”

He began writing “The Resurrectionist Book II: Lost People” a few months after finishing Book I, completing Book II in October 2016.

The Resurrectionist books follow a teenage protagonist, William Stark, as he struggles with a mental illness and confused faith that prevent him from loving the girl of his dreams. Circumstances beyond his control compel Will on a journey of self-discovery and inner courage as he navigates a perilous netherworld.

“These topics can be abstract and intangible for many young people, making them difficult to grasp and comprehend,” Gesellchen said. “I wanted to write books that could create a bridge between reality and spirituality, making these topics more tangible and hands on while appealing to young adult readers as well as a broader audience.”

Mike Gesellchen of Rogers started writing “The Resurrectionist” in 2004.
Mike Gesellchen of Rogers started writing “The Resurrectionist” in 2004.

He said the book plots are fast-paced, packed with action, elements of danger, and plenty of twists along the way.

“My goal for the books is to engage the reader in thinking about what might exist beyond the physical world of the five senses and bring awareness to the spiritual self,” he said. “My hope for the books is to inspire a journey of self-discovery amongst readers.”

Gesellchen’s writing process starts with a general idea of what he’d like the story to be and what message he intends to convey to the reader, writing a lot of different scenes and then putting them together “much like a puzzled which forms the story.”

“I like to put characters in situations they’re not normally comfortable with and see how they react,” he said.

Gesellchen isn’t just an author, but likes to include advice for other authors and would-be authors, such as writing at least 5 to 10 minutes per day.

“Sometimes the most creative ideas flow when you have no objective or plan,” he said. “You don’t necessarily need to spend long hours sitting in front of a keyboard starring at a blank screen.”

Gesellchen is a lifelong Minnesotan originally from New London. His wife and two children settled in Rogers, where “We are new to Rogers and love the community,” he said.

Gesellchen loves to get his children involved in the writing process by telling them stories, and in turn writing down stories his 4-year-old son tells him.

He does a lot of his writing and editing on, of all things, a mobile phone, “often with one child climbing on my head and another slapping at the screen!”

Mike Gesellchen wrote “The Resurrectionist Book II: Lost People” a few months after finishing Book I, completing Book II in October 2016.
Mike Gesellchen wrote “The Resurrectionist Book II: Lost People” a few months after finishing Book I, completing Book II in October 2016.

An avid reader himself, Gesellchen said a few of his favorite books include “Celestine Prophecy” by James Redfield, “Man’s Search for Meaning” by Viktor Frankl and “Way of the Peaceful Warrior” by Dan Millman.

“I tend to read works written in the Visionary and Christian fiction genre,” he said.

“The Resurrectionist” and “The Resurrectionist Book II: Lost People” are available in hard copy on Amazon.com as well as digital formats for Amazon Kindle and Barnes and Noble Nook.

” I love hearing from fellow readers and writers about their journeys, hopes, and inspirations. Feel free to contact me!” he said.

For more information see his website at mgesellchen2.wixsite.com/mikegesellchenwrites, or email [email protected]