Champlin Park students compete at state adapted bowling

Brooklyn Center alley hosts tournament again

By Matthew Davis

Sun Post Newspapers

Hailey Roering and Charlene Probst of Champlin Park each cracked the top 15 for an event at Minnesota’s biggest prep bowling event.

Charlene Probst bowls for Anoka-Hennepin at the state adapted bowling tournament. Probst, a junior at Champlin Park, took 14th in singles for the CI division. (Sun Post Staff Photo by Matthew Davis)

Charlene Probst bowls for Anoka-Hennepin at the state adapted bowling tournament. Probst, a junior at Champlin Park, took 14th in singles for the CI division. (Sun Post Staff Photo by Matthew Davis)

Roering and Probst both represented their school with the Anoka-Hennepin Mustangs at state adapted bowling tournament on Friday, May 16. The Mustangs consists of students from Anoka, Andover, Coon Rapids, Blaine and Champlin Park. A large group of Mustangs competed in the singles and doubles bowling events. The Minnesota State High School League has hosted the tournament for the past 15 years for both physically impaired and cognitively impaired students.

Probst, a junior, took 14th for CI singles in a tie with teammate Hannah Johnson.  Probst’s finish came in as the Mustangs’ third-highest finish of the day in the CI division.

She bowled a 91 with a handicap of 109 for game one to earn an overall total of 195. Probst hit 109 for a score in game two and earned an overall total of 213 with a 104 handicap. Her overall score came in at 408.

“She’s a real good, steady bowler,” Mustangs coach Jody Wahl said.

Probst also teamed up with James Johnson for doubles and took 67th out of 83 doubles teams. Besides knocking down pins, Probst brings camaraderie to her team.

“Charlie is like our cheerleader for our squad,” Wahl said. “She encourages everybody and gets them all fired up.

Roering, a junior, teamed up with Abigail MacDonald to earn a fifth-place finish in the PI division. Roering bowled a 98 in game one with a 126 handicap for an overall total of 224. She bowled an 86 in game to get a total mark of 212 and a grand total of 865.

Hailey Roering, a Champlin Park student and member of the Anoka-Hennepin Mustangs, gets a high-five after a knocking down pins at the state adapted bowling tournament. (Sun Post Staff Photo by Matthew Davis)

Hailey Roering, a Champlin Park student and member of the Anoka-Hennepin Mustangs, gets a high-five after a knocking down pins at the state adapted bowling tournament. (Sun Post Staff Photo by Matthew Davis)

“Hailey did great today,” Wahl said. ‘She’s only in her second year and really is one of our stronger bowlers in the PI division and a really good cheerleader, always encouraging for the other kids.”

Roering hit a grand total of 389 for 19th place. She has scores of 59 and 78 in games one and two respectively. Her handicap of 126 in each game gave her totals of 126 and 204 for the games.

 

Brooklyn Park bowling alley continues to host tournament

For the second-consecutive year, Brunswick Zone in Brooklyn Park played host to the state adapted bowling tournament.

“We absolutely love it,” Brunswick Zone general manager Fred Richardson said.

The tournament moved to Brooklyn Park after being in Eden Prairie for about a decade at their Brunswick Zone location. Brooklyn Park’s offers 48 lanes on two sides of the building, which better accommodates the growing tournament. Eden Prairie’s location had 32 lanes.

“Brunswick Zone has done a great job for us over the years down in Eden Prairie,” MSHSL assistant director Rich Matter said. “It gives us a little more room for both the bowlers and the patrons, the fans.”

Bowler participation also increased from the year before with 40 more according to Matter. When the first tournament took place in 2000, less than 100 bowlers competed. Now, the participation has passed 360.

“It has grown tremendously over the past 15 years,” Matter said.

Brooklyn Park’s Brunswick Zone, which also hosts Special Olympics bowling, has been able to accommodate the large crowd the past two years. Richardson hopes to keep having the tournament at the alley, the largest in the state.

“We’re open 365 days a year, so we can do events like this,” Richardson said. “I think this is exactly what our purpose is to be here for our community and to host events like this.”

Hosting the tournament also benefits the local economy since the parents of the bowlers take their families out to eat during the lunch break between sessions at the tournament. Many out-state schools also travel into Brooklyn Park to compete in the tournament.

“We enjoy having them here, and they seem to have a good time when they are here,” Brunswick Zone manager Tom Pickett said.

 

Contact Matthew Davis at matthew.davis@ecm-inc.com

 

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