Corcoran sewer/water policy proposes mandatory connections

The Corcoran City Council reviewed photos of the new public works facility site at County Rd. 19. Walls have gone up at the site, and masonry will continue for approximately four more weeks. (Sun staff photo by Aaron Brom)

The Corcoran City Council reviewed photos of the new public works facility site at County Rd. 19. Walls have gone up at the site, and masonry will continue for approximately four more weeks. (Sun staff photo by Aaron Brom)

Workers lay block inside the new Corcoran public works site. A city committee will soon approve selected colors and sample material for the building, which will be open in fall. (Sun staff photo by Aaron Brom)

Workers lay block inside the new Corcoran public works site. A city committee will soon approve selected colors and sample material for the building, which will be open in fall. (Sun staff photo by Aaron Brom)

Council to work out details before approval

The Corcoran City Council reviewed the sewer and water services policy that proposes mandatory connections charges when the services become available to a property.

The council also received the Lennar development Environmental Assessment Worksheet (EAW), and heard a public works facility update.

 

SEWER/WATER

City administrator Brad Martens updated the council regarding the sewer and water policy. The council met in a special work session in July to specifically address the policy.

Martens highlighted portions of the proposed policy, including that property owners would be required to connect to the sewer/water system when services become available to the property. “The ordinance will outline the terms of the required connection,” Martens said in his memo to the council.

An availability charge would be made against property owners whose property abuts a water or sanitary sewer line, even if the owner does not connect to the line. The policy also proposes that the city has authority to impose any combination of use, availability and connection charges to finance sewer and water facilities, and that utility fees and charges schedule shall be prepared annually by the city administrator and presented to the council for adoption.

“The fee schedule shall be comprehensive and list all utility fees and charges,” Martens noted.

Customers would be billed based on metered usage in per thousand gallon units, at an amount set annually by the city council. All real property connected to the system shall pay a water treatment surcharge per city ordinance, and sanitary sewer charges would be based on the amount of water used, with quarterly charges established.

Corcoran would own and maintain the sewer/water infrastructure, and infrastructure on private property would be the responsibility of the property owner to maintain and repair.

“Once the sanitary sewer and water services policy is approved, the next step is to draft and approve an ordinance related to sanitary sewer and water services,” Martens noted. “The city attorney will be drafting this policy for the council to review in the near future.”

Mayor Ken Guenthner and the council all said they have proposed changes to the plan. So Martens was directed to email a document to each council member so they can add their input. The policy was thus tabled for future discussion.

 

LENNAR EAW

In other matters, the council received the EAW for the Lennar Residential Development Plan.

The draft EAW is required pursuant to the Minnesota Environmental Review rules for residential developments with more than 250 homes for a city the size of Corcoran.

Lennar is a residential master planned community with 437 units on 264 acres located in the southwestern corner of the city (Gleason Road and County Rd. 101) near the Maple Grove/Medina border. The EAW’s 30-day time period ends July 31. Staff will finalize the draft EAW and distribute it for review and comment.

The council took no action but to allow for the next steps of public comment.

In related matters, staff said the Lennar home density would be about 2 units per acre, whereas the city’s comprehensive plan anticipates 3 to 5 units per acre.

“If the city council wishes to define accessory dwelling units for the purposes of density calculations, we should amend both the dwelling unit and accessory dwelling unit definitions to better reflect this intention,” city planner Kendra Lindahl wrote in her memo to the council.

The council directed staff to draft an amendment of what is a developable acre.

 

PUBLIC WORKS

In further news, the council reviewed photos of the new public works facility site at County Rd. 19.

Walls have gone up at the site, and masonry will continue for approximately four more weeks. Electrical power is schedule to the site by mid-August. Ebert Construction is requesting the architect provide all selected colors and sample material for committee final approval.

Completion is anticipated this fall.

In other action, the council:

HEARD an update regarding the Maple Hill Estates Community Center. This is a city project using grant funds. Barry Hay of Maple Hill Estates management said he would guarantee $30,000 in project costs covering the gap between the grant and project itself and avoiding city tax dollars. Administrator Martens will assist in getting a project schedule.

DISCUSSED the need for a downtown vision and timeline to update the city’s design guidelines for future downtown development. It will be brought back at a future meeting.

 

Contact Aaron Brom at aaron.brom@ecm-inc.com

 

Corcoran 7-25 1

The Corcoran City Council reviewed photos of the new public works facility site at County Rd. 19. Walls have gone up at the site, and masonry will continue for approximately four more weeks. (Sun staff photo by Aaron Brom)

 

Corcoran 7-25 2

Workers lay block inside the new Corcoran public works site. A city committee will soon approve selected colors and sample material for the building, which will be open in fall. (Sun staff photo by Aaron Brom)

up arrow