Public Notices 06/13/2013 – North Crow River News

Foreclosure Notice
(Official Publication)
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that default has been made in the terms and conditions of the Declaration of Riverplace Lodges Association, Inc., (hereinafter the Declaration) recorded in the office of the County Recorder of Wright County, Minnesota as Document No. 1028031, which covers the following property:
Legal Description: Lot 5, Block 3, Riverplace 2nd Addition, CIC No. 120
Property Address: 17473 54th Street NE, Otsego, Minnesota 55374
PID: R118-235-003050
THAT pursuant to said Declaration, there is claimed to be due and owing during the period March 2012 through April 8, 2013, from Daniel F. Malat, title holder, to Riverplace Lodges Association, Inc., a Minnesota non-profit corporation, the amount of $5,075.25, for assessments, late fees and collection costs, plus additional assessments and other amounts that may have accrued since the date of this notice, including the costs of collection and foreclosure;
THAT prior to the commencement of this foreclosure proceeding, Lienor complied with all notice requirements as required by status; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said lien, or any part thereof;
THAT the owner has not been released from his financial obligation to pay said amount;
THAT pursuant to the Declaration, said debt creates a lien upon said premises in favor of Riverplace Lodges Association, Inc., as evidenced by a lien statement recorded on March 7, 2013, in the office of the Wright County Recorder as Document No. A 1230266;
THAT pursuant to the power of sale granted by the owners in taking title to the premises subject to said Declaration, said lien will be foreclosed by the sale of said property by the sheriff of said County at the Main Office of the Wright County Sheriff, Civil Division, 3800 Braddock Avenue, NE, City of Buffalo, Wright County, Minnesota, on June 27, 2013, at 10 a.m., at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, to pay the amount then due for said assessments, together with the costs of foreclosure, including attorney’s fees as allowed by law. The time allowed by law for redemption by the unit owners, their personal representatives or assigns is six (6) months from the date of said sale.
DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the owner must vacate the property if the account is not brought current or the property redeemed under Minn. Stat. ‘ 580.23 is December 27, 2013. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m.
REDEMPTION NOTICE
THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE OWNER, THE OWNER’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED.
RIVERPLACE LODGES ASSOCIATION, INC., Lienor
Dated: April 8, 2013
By /s/ Thomas P. Carlson
Thomas P. Carlson (024871X)
Carlson & Associates, Ltd.
1052 Centerville Circle
Vadnais Heights, MN 55127
(651) 287-8640
ATTORNEY FOR RIVERPLACE LODGES ASSOCIATION, INC.
(May 9,16,23,30, Jun. 6,13, 2013) NC-MalatForeclosure
City of Rogers
(Official Publication)
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE KINGHORN LIFT STATION, FORCEMAIN, AND SANITARY SEWER EXTENSION IMPROVEMENTS
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Rogers will meet in the Rogers Community Room located at 21201 Memorial Drive, Rogers, Minnesota at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 25, 2013, to consider the extension of sanitary sewer in order to serve proposed development.
Improvements under consideration include the construction of a lift station, forcemain, and sanitary sewer, and other necessary appurtenant work pursuant to Minnesota Statutes sections 429.011 to 429.111.
The area proposed to be assessed for a portion of the improvements includes the Kinghorn Industrial Park located on the west and east sides of Brockton Lane. The estimated cost of the improvements is $817,000.
A reasonable estimate of the impact of the assessment will be available at the hearing. In addition, a reasonable estimate of the total amount to be assessed and a description of the methodology used to calculate the individual assessments for affected parcels will be available at the hearing.
Any person who desires to provide comments with reference to the proposed improvements will be heard at this meeting. Written or oral comments will be considered.
Steve Stahmer, City Administrator
(Published in the North Crow River News June 13th and June 20th, 2013)
(Jun. 13 & 20, 2013)
NC/CRW-KinghornIndParkPHN
City of Hanover
(Official Publication)
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
FOR AMENDMENTS TO ZONING ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Hanover, Counties of Hennepin and Wright, State of Minnesota, will hold a public hearing on Monday, June 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as possible, at Hanover City Hall for the purpose of receiving written and oral comments from the public on amendments to the entire Zoning Ordinance.
If you desire to be heard in reference to this matter, comments may be made at the public hearing or submitted to City Hall in writing prior to the hearing.
Dated this 6th day of June, 2013.
Bob Derus, Interim City Administrator
City of Hanover
Published in the June 13, 2013 issue of the North Crow River News and posted at the Hanover City Hall and Hanover Post Office.
(Jun. 13, 2013) NC-Jun24PHN
City of Hanover
(Official Publication)
CITY OF HANOVER
HENNEPIN AND WRIGHT COUNTIES
STATE OF MINNESOTA
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 02-12 TO PROVIDE FOR REIMBURSEMENT FOR COMPUTER AND COMPUTER RELATED EQUIPMENT
This Ordinance amends Ordinance No. 02-12, which is an ordinance providing for salaries for the Mayor and City Council, by adding a provision to allow for computer and computer related equipment reimbursement.
SECTION 1. AUTHORITY
This Ordinance is adopted pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 412.211
SECTION 2. PURPOSE
It is the purpose of this Ordinance to provide for reimbursement to the Mayor and City Council for a computer to be used in the performance of their duties as members of the Hanover City Council. In addition, this ordinance provides for cost savings by facilitating the distribution of official correspondence to the Hanover City Council via electronic means. If a Council member receives reimbursement under this Ordinance, the Council member will receive his or her agenda packet material and other official documents by electronic means and shall not be entitled to receive hard copies of the same documents.
SECTION 3. AMENDMENT
Ordinance No. 02-12 is hereby amended to provide for the following reimbursement:
The Mayor and City Councilors of the City of Hanover will be provided reimbursement by the City for an I-pad or other computer purchased for use in their official capacity as Hanover City Councilors in a maximum amount of $500 with receipt for proof of purchase of said computer.
The reimbursement will be done once per member per Council term. The computer must be purchased within the first six (6) months of the member’s term to be eligible for reimbursement as provided in this Ordinance. In the event of a vacancy, the Council member appointed or elected to fill the balance of the Council term shall also be entitled to reimbursement for a computer used in the performance of duties provided that at least 12 months remains in the balance of the Council term.
The computer purchases reimbursed under this Ordinance are the personal property of the Mayor or Councilmember. Individual Councilors may refuse this benefit.
Only those Councilors in office on February 1, 2013 and thereafter will be eligible for this computer and computer related equipment reimbursement. A Mayor-elect and Councilors-elect who will take office effective January 1 of any year may be reimbursed after January 1 of any year, for their computer equipment purchased prior to the effective date of the commencement of their term in office. Also, any Mayor or Councilmember in office at the time of the effective date of this ordinance may receive said reimbursement within one (1) month of the effective date.
SECTION 4. EFFECTIVE DATE
This Ordinance becomes effective upon its passage and thirty (30) days after its publication according to law.
PASSED by the City Council of the City of Hanover, Minnesota the 7th day of May, 2013.
Chris Kauffman
Mayor
ATTEST:
Annita Smythe
City Clerk
(Jun. 13, 2013)
NC-ComputerReimbursement
City of Rogers
(Official Publication)
NOTICE
CITY OF ROGERS
Notice is hereby given that the Planning Commission will be conducting a public hearing Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the Rogers Community Room, located at 21201 Memorial Drive, to consider a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to standardize terms between the City Code and the Zoning Ordinance relating to kennels.
Persons wishing to comment on this matter will be heard at this time.
Respectfully, Stephen Grittman, Planner.
Published in the Crow River News, Thursday, June 13, 2013.
(Jun. 13, 2013)
NC/CRW-KennelAmendment
City of Rogers
(Official Publication)
NOTICE
CITY OF ROGERS
Notice is hereby given that the Planning Commission will be conducting a public hearing on Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the Rogers Community Room, located at 21201 Memorial Drive, to consider a request by Northern Dewatering for a Conditional Use Permit to allow outside storage of equipment, located at 14485 Northdale Blvd., and legally described as:
That pt of the S 1458.75 ft of the E 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of Sec 11, Twp 120, R 23, lying W of TH 101, except that part of the S 30 ft of MnDOT r/w plat No 27-61 as the same is on file & of record in the office of the County Recorder in and for Henn. Co., Minn. which lies E of the Nly extn of W line of Lot 1, Block 1, Hassan Industrial Park; which lies W of line 1 desc below. Line 1: Beg at the boundary corner B11 as shown on MnDOT r/w plat No 27-60 as the same is on file at Henn. Co, Minn, th Nly to boundary corner B4 as shown on MnDOT r/w plat No 27-61 as the same is on file and of record in the office of the county recorder in and for Henn. Co, Minn. and there terminating also except roads.
all in Sec. 11, Township 120, R 23, Hennepin County, Minnesota, according to the recorded plat thereof.
PID #11-120-23 24 0004.
Persons wishing to comment on this matter will be heard at this time.
Respectfully, Steve Grittman, City Planner.
Published in the North Crow River News Thursday, June 13, 2013.
(Jun. 13, 2013)
NC/CRW-NorthernDewatering
City of Rogers
(Official Publication)
NOTICE
CITY OF ROGERS
Notice is hereby given that the Planning Commission will be conducting a public hearing Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the Rogers Community Room, located at 21201 Memorial Drive, to consider a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to revise the definition of corner lot in Sec. 121-1 and Sec. 125-1 and establish required setbacks for various principal and accessory uses on corner lots.
Persons wishing to comment on this matter will be heard at this time.
Respectfully, Stephen Grittman, Planner.
Published in the Crow River News, Thursday, June 13, 2013.
(Jun. 13, 2013)
NC/CRW-CornerLots
City of Albertville
(Official Publication)
City of Albertville
COUNTY OF WRIGHT
STATE OF MINNESOTA
Ordinance NO. 2013 – 003
An Ordinance Amending section 5-5-3 (EXCEPTION; OUTDOOR MUSICAL PERFORMANCES) OF CHAPTER 5 (NOISE CONTROL), TITLE 5 (HEALTH AND SANITATION) OF THE ALBERTVILle City Code, relating to THE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR OUTDOOR MUSIC EVENTS
The city council of the city of Albertville, Minnesota ordains:
SECTION 1. Section 5-5-3 (Exception; Outdoor Musical Performances) of Chapter 5 (Noise Control) is hereby amended as follows:
5-5-3: EXCEPTION; OUTDOOR MUSICAL PERFORMANCES: The provisions of section 5-5-1 and subsection 5-5-2E of this chapter do not apply to outdoor musical performances which have a permit approved and issued by the city council. The following criteria shall apply to issuance of a live major outdoor musical performance permit:
A. Any person, organization, and/or entity shall be limited to a maximum of two (2) major permits per year. No commercial property shall host more than three (3) major events in a calendar year.
B. The permit applicant must pay a permit fee as set by the city council by ordinance and provide information and/or a plan(s) that demonstrates that the site event will comply with the performance standards of this code.
C. The permit applicant must demonstrate that there will be adequate sanitary facilities for the event.
D. The permit applicant must demonstrate that there will be adequate security and fencing to control access to the event at the location of the outdoor musical performance.
E. The permit applicant must have sufficient off-street parking. The music event shall not occupy required parking for the principal use of the site.
F. The major outdoor musical performance must not interfere with other commercial and governmental activities or with the quiet enjoyment of residential property.
G. The stage, performers, speakers and amplifiers are located three hundred feet (300’) from any residence located in a residential zoning district.
H. The stage, speakers, and amplifiers are arranged in a design and manner that does not directly broadcast music at or toward a residence within three hundred feet (300’) of the stage.
I. Major outdoor music events shall be allowed between May 15th and October 15th and the live outdoor musical performance shall only occur on the dates and during the hours designated by the city council.
J. Major outdoor music events shall not perform beyond 12:00 midnight.
K. The volume of the outdoor musical performance must be reasonable. The permit holder shall comply with all requests of the Sheriff’s Department to reduce volumes to mitigate nuisance complaints. (Ord. 2004-05, 6-7-2004)
L. Failure to abide by these standards or the receipt of nuisance complaints may be grounds for denial of future major outdoor musical permits for the property.
M. Minor Live Outdoor Music Permit. An annual permit may be issued by the city council for the operation of outdoor live music events in a manner that will not unreasonably disturb the peace, quiet, or comfort of adjoining residential neighborhoods. The following criteria shall apply to the issuance of a minor live outdoor music event permit:
1. The minor live outdoor music event permit may only be issued to commercial properties.
2. The permit shall be issued annually for a calendar year. Minor live outdoor music events shall only be allowed between the dates of May 15th to October 15th.
3. The permit applicant shall provide a calendar that identifies the days in the week when minor live outdoor events may occur. The city council, in consideration of the permit, may place limits on the number of minor live outdoor music events. Events outside the approved calendar shall be prohibited.
4. Minor live outdoor music events shall comply with all the stage and performance setbacks of a major outdoor music event, as outlined in Section 5-5-3 of the city code.
5. Minor live outdoor music events shall not perform between the hours of 9:00 PM and 11:00 AM Sunday through Thursday, and 10:00 PM and 11:00 AM Friday and Saturday.
6. The volume of the minor live outdoor music performances must be reasonable so as not to be audible at the shared property line with a residentially zoned property. The permit holder shall comply with all requests of the Sheriff’s Department to mitigate nuisance complaints.
7. In review of a minor live outdoor music event permit, the city may impose additional conditions deemed necessary to mitigate nuisance complaints and protect adjoining properties. Such conditions may include, but not be limited to, the following:
a. Limit the days of the week for minor live outdoor music events.
b. Restrict the hours of the minor live music event beyond those stated in Section 5-5-3.M.5 of this code.
c. Limit the size and location of minor live outdoor music events.
d. Limit amplification or type of instruments (i.e., prohibit percussion instruments or brass wind instruments).
8. Failure to abide by the standards and conditions of the minor live outdoor music event permit or the receipt of nuisance complaints may be grounds for denial or revocation of the minor live outdoor music event permit for a property.
This amendment shall be in full force and effective immediately following its passage and publication.
Approved by the Albertville City Council this 3rd day of June 2013.
Jillian Hendrickson, Mayor
Kimberly A. Olson, City Clerk
(Jun. 13, 2013) NC-Ord2013-003
Certificate of Assumed Name
(Official Publication)
Office of the Minnesota
Secretary of State
Certificate of Assumed Name
Minnesota Statutes, 333
The filing of an assumed name does not provide a user with exclusive rights to that name. The filing is required for consumer protection in order to enable consumers to be able to identify the true owner of a business.
ASSUMED NAME:
A-1 Quick Lube of STMA
PRINCIPAL PLACE
OF BUSINESS:
865 Central Ave E PO Box 384 St. Michael MN 55376 USA
NAMEHOLDER(S):
Name: STMA Auto Center, Inc Address: 865 Central Ave E PO Box 384 St. Michael MN 55376
If you submit an attachment, it will be incorporated into this document. If the attachment conflicts with the information specifically set forth in this document, this document supersedes the data referenced in the attachment.
By typing my name, I, the undersigned, certify that I am signing this document as the person whose signature is required, or as agent of the person(s) whose signature would be required who has authorized me to sign this document on his/her behalf, or in both capacities. I further certify that I have completed all required fields, and that the information in this document is true and correct and in compliance with the applicable chapter of Minnesota Statutes. I understand that by signing this document I am subject to the penalties of perjury as set forth in Section 609.48 as if I had signed this document under oath.
FILED: 5/20/2013
SIGNED BY: Mark Daleiden
(June 13 & 20, 2013)
NC-A1QuickLubeofSTMA

School District 885
(Official Publication)
St. Michael – Albertville Independent School
District 885
School Board Minutes
St. Michael-Albertville Middle School West Board Room – Door A
Dr. Jim Behle, Superintendent of Schools
Douglas Birk, Chair; Gayle Weber, Vice-Chair; Carol Steffens, Clerk; Drew Scherber, Treasurer; Jeanne Holland, Director; Jeffery Lindquist, Director
Monday, May 20, 2013
The St. Michael-Albertville School Board held a Regular meeting in the St. Michael-Albertville District Office board room at 7:00 p.m.
Board Members
Present:
Doug Birk
Jeanne Holland
Drew Scherber
Carol Steffens
Gayle Weber
Absent:
Jeff Lindquist
Staff
James Behle
Jeanette Aanerud
Ben Bakeberg
Sheila Bichler
Jennifer Claseman
Ann-Marie Foucault
Jolene Herfel
Wayne Hoistad
Lynn Jennissen
Board Secretary:
Suzanne Gallagher
Regular Meeting at 7:00 p.m.
1. Approval of Agenda Items
Steffens/Holland. Motion to approve agenda items as presented. Motion carried.
2. Correction and Approval of Previous Minutes
a. Regular Meeting on Monday, May 6, 2013
Weber/Holland. Motion to approve Regular Meeting Minutes of Monday, May 6, 2013 as presented. Motion carried.
b. Special Meeting on Wednesday, May 13, 2013
Steffens/Weber. Motion to approve Special Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, May 13, 2013 as presented. Aye: Birk, Steffens, Weber. Nay: None. Abstain: Holland, Scherber.
3. Student Recognition
a. Prudential Spirit of Community Award Presentation
Scott Zoellner from Prudential Insurance Company of America presented sophomore Kristina Swenson with the Prudential Spirit of Community Award which included an engraved medallion. Zoellner said that the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program is the United States’ largest youth recognition program based exclusively on volunteer community service. Zoellner said the program’s goals are to applaud young people who are already making a positive difference in their towns and neighborhoods, and to inspire others to think about how they might contribute to their communities. Kristina Swenson raised more than $23,000 since 2011 to benefit the Miracles of Mitch Foundation and its mission to provide financial assistance to families of children battling cancer. In addition to participating in the organizations’ annual benefit triathlon, Kristina raised funds by creating and organizing a silent auction event.
b. State and Nationally Recognized Students for Art, Music, Broadcast Journalism and Debate/Student Congress
The board brought forth and acknowledged students for their state and nationally recognized accomplishments.
Business Professionals of America National Leadership Conference — Jillian Edling (11), Maia Rehovsky (11), Brenna Schlauderaff (11), and Matt Borgen (12)
Four students from the STMA Chapter of Business Professionals of America (BPS) attended the National Leadership Conference in Orlando, Florida in May. The event culminated a year of hard work at the regional and state level in order to advance to the national level. Jillian Edling, Maia Rehovsky, and Brenna Schlauderaff participated in the national competition in presentation management. Matt Borgen competed in computer modeling and advanced to the final round of competition, placing 7th overall. Business Professionals of America’s Torch Awards Program frames and guides a BPA member’s leadership and service to their chapter and community. This Ambassador Award was presented to all four students attending the competition, and Alex Berg (12) BPA Vice President.
National Forensic League National Speech and Debate — Cody Goodchild (11) and Jed Rothstein (11)
For the third year consecutive year, Cody Goodchild and Jed Rothstein advanced to the highest level of competition for public speaking — the National Forensic League National Speech and Debate tournament, held this year in Birmingham, Alabama. Cody and Jed will compete in Congressional Debate where they will take on the roles of a Senator and a Representative to debate legislation submitted by competitors from around the country.
“Buckle Up & Pay Attention” TV PSA Contest Finalist, MN Department of Public Safety — Eli Guillou (12)
For the second year in a row, Eli Guillou’s video entry into the MN Department of Public Safety’s commercial contest was selected as a finalist. Last year, Eli won the contest. This year’s topic was distracted driving and the commercial with the most votes will win. If Eli wins he will receive $1,000 from AAA and his Public Service Announcement will play nationally on the MTV Video Music Awards.
American Choral Director’s Association National High School Honor Choir – Max Rooney (11)
Max Rooney is one of ten students in the state selected to participate in the 2013 American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) National High School Honor Choir. Max represented STMA at the ACDA national convention March 13th -16th in Dallas, Texas.
National Scholastic Award — Katie Scott (12), Wesley Van’t Hull (10), and Cortney Woodis (12)
The Scholastic Awards are the nation’s largest, longest-running, most prestigious scholarship and recognition program for creative teens. Of the 230,000 submissions to the Awards this year, only 1% received National recognition. STMA High School had three winners of this prestigious award: Wesley Van’t Hull and Cortney Woodis for drawing, and Katie Scott for photography. National Scholastic Award Medalists will be honored in New York City in late May. This National Celebration includes a ceremony at Carnegie Hall, an exhibition of selected National Medalist art and writing at Parsons the New School for Design, and Pratt Manhattan Gallery.
High School Principal Bob Driver congratulated the winners and thanked their parents for their support. Superintendent Behle also congratulated the students on their great accomplishments. The board congratulated all of the student award winners stating that they have special talents, are truly remarkable and are assets to our school and the St. Michael-Albertville community.
4. Visitors
a. Persons not on the agenda wishing to address the school board, 5 minutes per individual
5. Reports
a. Legislative Update
Dr. Behle gave a legislative update to the board. He told the board that a K-12 finance bill passed which would increase funding by $485 million for all-day every day kindergarten, special education, early childhood education and an increase in the basic formula of 1.5% per year for the next two years. Funding for all-day kindergarten would begin in the 2014-15 school year and would be funded at 1.0 ADM. Dr. Behle assured the board that the Primary building would be able to house the number of necessary classrooms. The basic formula increase of 1.5% each year would be approximately $78 and $80 per pupil, respectively. Additional dollars are appropriated to property-poor school districts for state property tax equalization. Referendum changes include the option of making the first $300 per pupil of referendum revenue rather than voter approved, board approved. Equalization is enhanced significantly for the first $300. A location equity index was also implemented which replaces $200 per pupil of referendum revenue for school districts with more than 2,000 students. The GRAD test will be replaced with a normed college entrance exam. Finally, the teacher evaluation requirements were amended by eliminating value-added models as a requirement for 35% of teacher evaluation and replacing it with valid and reliable assessments aligned to state and national standards and state and local measures of student growth on student learning goals. Dr. Behle told the board this was currently being addressed through Q-comp and the districts new teacher evaluation process.
6. Old Business
a. Action on Wireless Infrastructure and Mobile Device Pilot Plan for 2013-2014
Dr. Behle shared revised and additional information about a district mobile device pilot plan, specifically focusing on how mobile device technology would be used in the classrooms, rather than the type of device used. Behle told the board the pilot program would allow the district to find the right technology tools and training opportunities and determine future steps. Behle said the pilot includes a proposal to allow students in four classrooms at each middle school to bring their own devices. The high school would only use school owned devices with a focus only in special education. A pilot would also be conducted at Fieldstone Elementary, using the existing infrastructure and mobile devices. In addition to learning more about the use of wireless technology and mobile devices from the one year pilot, an additional purpose of the pilot would be to better inform the board of the use and outcomes of technology in teaching and learning. Behle told the board the pilots would include the following information: how technology will be used – research, applications, assessment, etc.; what applications, websites and programs students will access; how student learning will be assessed – surveys, student outcomes; what training will be required for teachers; how equal access for students without devices will be supported; and how the pilot and use of technology will be communicated to parents
Dr. Behle told the board that up to four access points would be installed at each middle school and two at the high school in the special education area with a cost of $10,500. Dr. Behle also included the cost to purchase additional mobile devices to be used in the pilot to ensure equal access among students, anticipating up to 15 devices at three sites (two middle schools and the high school), the cost of the devices would be $6,000-$9,000 per set of 15. Behle also said the costs of the infrastructure and devices would come from the reserve in the Capital Projects and if possible, some of the costs from the $300,000 levy budget for technology. The cost for the devices for special education would come from federal special education dollars. Dr. Behle assured the board no additional staff would be required.
The board continued its discussion from the May 6, 2013 board meeting on wireless infrastructure and mobile devices. The board continues to have significant concern that there appears to be no accurate measure for the interweaving between teaching and technology. Additionally, Board Chair Birk is very concerned about parental communication and potential financial burden for families. They agreed that the investment for the pilot program would have residual academic purposes. The board asked Dr. Behle to provide updates regarding the pilot program.
Steffens/Holland. Motion to approve the Wireless Infrastructure and Mobile Device Pilot Plan for 2013-2014 at the discretion of the Superintendent up to $38,500 with regular updates to the board. Aye: Birk, Holland, Steffens. Nay: Scherber. Abstain: Weber
7. New Business
a. Action on Albertville Primary 2013-2014 Student Handbook – Ann-Marie Foucault
Dr. Foucault presented the Albertville Primary 2013-2014 Student Handbook to the board with a brief description of the changes, most of which make the handbook consistent with the elementary school handbook. Some changes include updated district vision and strategic directions, dismissal, teasing, bullying and harassment, emergency closings, and devices. The revision to devices included adding “e-readers need to be approved by administration”. Board Member Weber requested information about when the policy to bring electronic devices to school was approved. She stated that handbooks should directly reflect the policies and is concerned about adding information about electronic devices contrary to the current policy. Superintendent Behle referenced Policy 506 – Discipline, and told Member Weber that he felt adding information regarding electronics was not intentional misrepresentation of the policy. Dr. Behle and the board agreed to review and discuss Policy 506 at a June board meeting. Discussion will include alignment of the policy with handbooks and current practice.
Holland/Scherber. Motion to approve the Albertville Primary 2013-2014 Student Handbook as presented. Aye: Birk, Holland, Scherber, Steffens. Nay: Weber
b. Action on Middle School East and West 2013-2014 Student Handbook – Ben Bakeberg and Lynn Jennissen
Ben Bakeberg and Lynn Jennissen presented the changes to the Middle School East and West 2013-2014 student handbook. They told the board there were a total of 20 changes, with the majority of changes clarifications, corrections, and edits. Edits included updating mission, vision and strategic directions, lost and found, lunchroom procedures, and disrespectful or foul language. Bakeberg and Jennissen also told the board they had information in their handbook regarding ”electronic devices being subject to approval of the building principal”.
Scherber/Holland. Motion to approve the Middle School East and West Student 2013-2014 Handbook as presented. Aye: Birk, Holland, Scherber, Steffens. Nay: Weber
c. Action on Transportation Contract
Transportation Director, Wayne Hoistad told the board the transportation contract is a two year contract with an option held by the district to renew for two additional years. There is a rate increase of 2.5% in year one, 2% in year two, and 1.5% in years three and four. The rates continue to be less than 2008-09. The district will purchase a three camera system for all buses at a total cost of $95,000 which will be paid from Safe School dollars. – $22,500 from 2012-13 budget, $22,500 from 2013-14, $22,500 from 2014-15, and the balance in 2015-16. Don’s Bus has agreed to fund the last two years and the district will reimburse them the money in the final two years of the contract. This agreement will allow all cameras to be installed this summer. Additionally, Don’s Bus has agreed to pay for a GPS system which is estimated to be $10,000, in addition to the upgrades they will need to make to the bus radios. Hoistad told the board there are no additional language changes in the contract.
Scherber/Holland. Motion to approve the Student Transportation Services Agreement for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 school years as presented. Motion carried.
d. Action on Increasing Fieldstone Elementary Title I position from .8 FTE to 1.0 FTE
Dr. Behle told the board that Fieldstone Elementary is the only Title I building in the district and that currently we are exceeding federal reserve limitations. Behle told the board the district would be able to sustain the increase from .8 FTE to 1.0 FTE without going into reserves.
Weber/Holland. Motion to approve Increasing the Fieldstone Elementary Title I position from .8 FTE to 1.0 FTE. Motion carried.
e. Action on Girls Hockey Cooperative Agreement
Scherber/Holland. Motion to Approve the Girls Hockey 2013-2014 Cooperative Agreement for the as presented. Motion carried.
f. Action on 2013-14 Resolution for Membership in the Minnesota State High School League
Steffens/Holland. Motion to approve the 2013-14 Resolution for Membership in the Minnesota State High School League as presented. Aye: Birk, Holland, Scherber, Steffens, Weber. Nay: None.
g. Action on Debate/Student Congress Coach
Dr. Behle told the board that the district currently has a Debate/Student Congress program which is coached by volunteers, with two students who have gone to national competition. Activities Director Benson wrote a one-year grant that was approved for $1,500 to fund a Debate/Student Congress program. Dr. Behle estimated 18-20 students would participate in the program and said they are working with the union to determine stipend on the extra duty schedule. Behle anticipated the cost of the stipend to be $2,500 to $3,000 and additional costs would include transportation and registration fees. Board Member Scherber said he would not approve the position because the last conversation the board had with Boys La Crosse was that no additional teams would be added. Dr. Behle stated that a volunteer oversaw the program in the past, and unlike La Crosse, there is no community club.
Holland/Steffens. Motion to Approve a Debate/Student Congress Coach as presented. Aye: Birk, Holland, Steffens. Nay: Scherber, Weber. Motion carried.
8. Consent Agenda
Steffens/Holland. Motion to approve the Consent Agenda as presented. Motion carried.
a. Claims and Accounts
Payroll $1,351,082.98
General Fund (01) $1,030,226.44
Food Service (02) $108,022.57
Community
Service (04) $28,497.10
Trust Fund (08) $500.00
Agency Fund (09) $4,625.61
Total $2,522,954.70
b. Treasurer’s Report
c. Trip Requests
1) Rich Jensen/Kristin Kasper (ME) – 6th Grade Team A Field Trip to Long Lake Conservation Center, Palisade, MN, 11-13-13 to 11-15-13
2) Rich Jensen/Kristin Kasper (ME) – 6th Grade Team B Field Trip to Long Lake Conservation Center, Palisade, MN, 11-20-13 to 11-22-13
d. Resignations, Retirements, Terminations, Layoffs
1) Bykowski, Tim (HS) – Art Teacher, retirement, effective 6-7-2013
2) Dallum, Kandy (ME) – Special Education Paraprofessional, resignation, effective 5-20-2013
3) Eggert, Mary (CE) – Kids Play Paraprofessional, resignation, effective 6-6-2013
4) Freidt, Kimberly (ME) – Guidance Counselor, resignation, effective 6-14-2013
5) Hertwig, Summer (AP) – Kindergarten Teacher Long Term Substitute, position concludes 06-07-2013
6) Johnson, Brandon (Activity Center) – Paraprofessional, resignation, effective 5-26-2013
7) Kilian, Kristine (CE) – Kids Play Paraprofessional, resignation, effective 5-24-2013
8) Parson, Mara (AP) – Kindergarten Teacher Long Term Substitute, position concludes 6-7-2013
9) Purdy, Audrey (ME) – 7th Grade Language Arts Long Term Substitute, position concludes, effective 6-7-2013
10) Simon, Susan (CE) – Kids Play Paraprofessional, resignation, effective 5-30-2013
11) Wiese, Jennifer (AP) – Kindergarten Teacher Long Term Substitute, position concludes 06-07-2013
e. Employment 2012-2013
1) Couch-Hollerman, Mary (MW) – Guidance Counselor Long Term Substitute replacing Melanie Chapman, 12 hours per week, current .7 FTE is not increasing, 5-21-2013 to 6-6-2013
2) Hagerty, Susan (CE) – Kids Play Seasonal Paraprofessional, Monday-Thursday and 5 hours per day, effective 6-3-2013 to 8-23-2013
3) Johnson, Derek T (HS) – 9th Grade Football Coach, replacing Josh Fisher, effective 8-12-2013
f. Employment 2013-2014
1) Erickson, April (MW) – 5th Grade Art Teacher, 1.0 FTE, transferring from 1.0 FTE split position between MW (.5 FTE) and STME (.5 FTE)
2) Hamlet, Jacob (HS) – Science Teacher, 1.0 FTE, MA+30 Step 6, new position, effective 8-21-2013
3) Horning, Kimberly (HS) – Spanish Teacher, 1.0 FTE transferring from Middle School East Spanish Teacher, replacing Kelly Negaard, effective 8-21-2013
4) Perbix, Lisa (HS) – English Language Learner Teacher, 1.0 FTE, BA +20 Step 2, replacing Sara Shaw, effective 8-21-2013
5) Randall, Erin (MW) – Speech Language Pathologist, 1.0 FTE, transferring from 1.0 FTE split position between MW (.4 FTE) and STME (.6 FTE)
6) Wheeler, Andrea (HS) – Spanish Teacher, new position, 1.0 FTE, BA Step 1, effective 8-21-2013
g. Leave of Absence
1) Garlock, Valerie (AP) – Health Paraprofessional, Medical-Employee Medical Leave (non-FMLA), effective 4-30-2013 to 6-6-2013
2) Hydukovich, Nicole (AP) – Speech-Language Pathologist, Maternity – Family Medical Leave Act and Extended Family Leave on or about 11-6-2013 to 4-2-2014
9. Donations
Donations recently made to the schools in the district were recognized by the board. A list of donations is available in the district office.
10. Information Items
a. Retiree Recognition
The board gave their best wishes to the 2012-13 retirees: Franklin Blake, Joan Bykowski, Tim Bykowski, Joyce Casey, Patti Jaeb, Marcia Schirber and Debra Thornburgh. The board presented plaques to each retiree at the Retiree Reception earlier in the evening. Board Chair Birk thanked the retirees for their years of dedicated service and for everything they have done for the school district.
b. High School Graduation Ceremony, June 7, 2013
11. Correspondence
12. Future Meeting Dates
Monday, June 3, 2013 – Regular Meeting at 7:00 p.m.
Monday, June 3, 2013 – Special (Closed) Meeting following Regular Meeting to Discuss Superintendent Evaluation
Friday, June 7, 2013 – High School Graduation at 7:30 p.m., HS Gym
Monday, June 17, 2013 – Regular Meeting at 7:00 p.m.
Monday, July 15, 2013 – Regular Meeting at 7:00 pm. (one meeting in July)
13. Adjourn to Special (Closed) Meeting
Steffens/Scherber. Motion to adjourn to a Special (Closed) Meeting at 9:45 p.m. Motion carried.
Carol Steffens, Clerk
(Jun. 13, 2013) NC-May20RegMin
School District 885
(Official Publication)
St. Michael – Albertville Independent School
District 885
School Board Minutes – Special (Closed) Meeting
St. Michael-Albertville Middle School West Board Room – Door A
Dr. Jim Behle, Superintendent of Schools
Douglas Birk, Chair; Gayle Weber, Vice-Chair; Carol Steffens, Clerk; Drew Scherber, Treasurer; Jeanne Holland, Director; Jeffery Lindquist, Director
Monday, May 20, 2013
The St. Michael-Albertville School Board held a Special (Closed) meeting following the regular meeting in the St. Michael-Albertville board room.
Board Members
Present:
Doug Birk
Jeanne Holland
Drew Scherber
Carol Steffens
Gayle Weber
Absent:
Jeff Lindquist
Staff
James Behle
Special Meeting (Closed) – after regular board meeting
1. Call to Order
2. Discuss Certified Staff Contract Negotiations
Closed session pursuant to State Statute 13D.03 – Closed Meetings for Labor Negotiations Strategy to discuss certified staff contract negotiations
3. Adjournment
Special (Closed) Meeting adjourned at 10:30 p.m.
Carol Steffens, Clerk
(Jun. 13, 2013)
NC-May20SpecMin

City of Rogers
(Official Publication)
City of Rogers
2012 Drinking Water Report
The City of Rogers is issuing the results of monitoring done on its drinking water for the period from January 1 to December 31, 2012. The purpose of this report is to advance consumers’ understanding of drinking water and heighten awareness of the need to protect precious water resources.
This report is not being mailed directly to all customers. If you would like to request a copy of the CCR please contact the City of Rogers at 763-428-8580.
Source of Water
The City of Rogers provides drinking water to its residents from a groundwater source: six wells ranging from 356 to 374 feet deep, that draw water from the Ironton-Galesville, Franconia-Ironton-Galesville, and Ironton-Galesville-Eau Claire aquifers.
The water provided to customers may meet drinking water standards, but the Minnesota Department of Health has also made a determination as to how vulnerable the source of water may be to future contamination incidents. If you wish to obtain the entire source water assessment regarding your drinking water, please call 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 during normal business hours. Also, you can view it on line at www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/water/swp/swa.
Call 763-428-8580 if you have questions about the City of Rogers drinking water or would like information about opportunities for public participation in decisions that may affect the quality of the water.
Results of Monitoring
No contaminants were detected at levels that violated federal drinking water standards. However, some contaminants were detected in trace amounts that were below legal limits. The table that follows shows the contaminants that were detected in trace amounts last year. (Some contaminants are sampled less frequently than once a year; as a result, not all contaminants were sampled for in 2012. If any of these contaminants were detected the last time they were sampled for, they are included in the table along with the date that the detection occurred.)
Key to abbreviations:
MCLG—Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
MCL—Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
MRDL—Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level.
MRDLG—Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal.
AL—Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirement which a water system must follow.
90th Percentile Level—This is the value obtained after disregarding 10 percent of the samples taken that had the highest levels. (For example, in a situation in which 10 samples were taken, the 90th percentile level is determined by disregarding the highest result, which represents 10 percent of the samples.) Note: In situations in which only 5 samples are taken, the average of the two with the highest levels is taken to determine the 90th percentile level.
pCi/l—PicoCuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity).
ppm—Parts per million, which can also be expressed as milligrams per liter (mg/l).
ppb—Parts per billion, which can also be expressed as micrograms per liter (μg/l).
nd—No Detection.
N/A—Not Applicable (does not apply).
Level Found
Range Average
Contaminant (units) MCLG MCL (2012) /Result* Typical Source of Contaminant
Alpha Emitters (pCi/l) 0 15.4 N/A 4.6 Erosion of natural deposits.
(11/01/2011)
Barium (ppm) 2 2 N/A .05 Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge
(04/27/2011) from metal refineries; Erosion of natural
deposits.
Combined Radium 0 5.4 N/A 4.0 Erosion of natural deposits.
(pCi/l)
(11/01/20111)
Fluoride (ppm) 4 4 1-1.1 1.08 State of Minnesota requires all municipal
water systems to add fluoride to the
drinking water to promote strong teeth;
Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge
from fertilizer and aluminum factories.
TTHM (Total 0 80 N/A .4 By-product of drinking water
trihalomethanes) (ppb) disinfection.
(08/09/2011)
*This is the value used to determine compliance with federal standards. It sometimes is the highest value detected and sometimes is an average of all the detected values. If it is an average, it may contain sampling results from the previous year.
Contaminant (units) MRDLG MRDL **** ***** Typical Source of Contaminant
Chlorine (ppm) 4 4 1.1-1.6 1.3 Water additive used to control microbes.
****Highest and Lowest Monthly Average.
*****Highest Quarterly Average.
90% # sites
Contaminant (units) MCLG AL Level over AL Typical Source of Contaminant
Copper (ppm) 1.3 1.3 .48 0 out of 20 Corrosion of household plumbing
systems; Erosion of natural deposits.
Lead (ppb) 0 15 1.7 0 out of 20 Corrosion of household plumbing
(06/20/2011) systems; Erosion of natural deposits.
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. City of Rogers is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Monitoring may have been done for additional contaminants that do not have MCLs established for them and are not required to be monitored under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Results may be available by calling 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 during normal business hours.
Compliance with National Primary Drinking Water Regulations
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1 800 426 4791.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1 800 426 4791.
(Jun. 13, 2013) NC/CRW-2012DrinkingWaterReport

Comments Closed

up arrow