MGJH celebrates February as Career and Technical Education Month

Governor Mark Dayton has proclaimed February as Career and Technical Education month.

MGJH Technology Education teacher Marie Lundt works with students to help teach them about various mechanical systems.

MGJH Technology Education teacher Marie Lundt works with students to help teach them about various mechanical systems.

With that in mind, Maple Grove Junior High School’s Technology Education is working with Project Lead The Way and Gateway To Technology curriculums in grades seven to nine.

These programs provide the inspiration for a new generation of innovators, the practical skills and hands-on experience to make students’ knowledge count in the real world, and the basis for the next generation of leadership in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Ryan Smolarek, MGJH Technology Education teacher, works with some seventh grade students learning about mechanical systems.

Ryan Smolarek, MGJH Technology Education teacher, works with some seventh grade students learning about mechanical systems.

Gateway To Technology helps develop motivated, well-rounded students by instilling confidence, stressing the importance of self-discovery, encouraging innovative problem solving and critical thinking, teaching team building and rewarding creativity.

Project Lead the Way is designed for all students and address national standards in math, science and technology. One of the goals is to increase interest and awareness in technology and related careers.

  • Jason Sprenger

    CTE programs, whether at the secondary, post-secondary or other educational level, boost student achievement and deliver increased career and earning potential. CTE also produces workers for the open jobs of today, and boosts business productivity and economic status as a result.

    The Industry Workforce Needs Council is a new organization of businesses working together to spotlight skills gaps and advocate/kick off CTE programs that work to curb the problem. For more information, or to join the effort, visit http://www.iwnc.org.

    Jason Sprenger, for the IWNC

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