Rosin starts work as new Loretto City Clerk

New Loretto City Clerk Travis Rosin grew up in Nicollet, a town slightly larger than Loretto.

What’s different for him is the chance to see the Minnesota Wild and Minnesota Twins play without committing himself to a long distance drive.

New Loretto City Clerk Travis Rosin familiarizes himself with concept plans for redevelopment in downtown Loretto. He also is getting acquainted with Loretto issues and government agencies that affect Loretto’s future. (Sun staff photo by Susan Van Cleaf)

New Loretto City Clerk Travis Rosin familiarizes himself with concept plans for redevelopment in downtown Loretto. He also is getting acquainted with Loretto issues and government agencies that affect Loretto’s future. (Sun staff photo by Susan Van Cleaf)

Rosin began work in Loretto on Jan. 2 under the watchful eye of outgoing City Clerk Cindy Patnode. “She was very helpful,” Rosin said.

About her career as Loretto’s City Clerk, he said, “I give her a lot of credit for what she’s done.”

Now, with his first City Council meeting recorded in his minutes, he and his assistant Mary Schneider are learning how to operate as a team so they can back up each other. Rosin plans to concentrate on the city clerk side of Loretto operations, and Schneider will specialize in city finances. City office hours will continue to be 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

The Loretto City Clerk position is part-time, so Rosin continues to work at Label Works, a subsidiary of Taylor Corporation located in the Mankato area. He is looking for a job with a Taylor company in the Twin Cities so that he can move from St. Peter to the Twin Cities area — perhaps as early as March.

Rosin is well on his way to a career in public administration. He holds a degree in political science and history from Waldorf College, Forest City, Iowa. He garnered his first city clerk experience in his hometown of Nicollet, which then had a population of around 830. From there he went to St. Peter where he served as a clerk intern for the city administrator. Then he went on to clerk work in North Mankato.

He called his stints in St. Peter and North Mankato good experience because now he has seen what happens in cities of different sizes. “I know what the expectations are,” Rosin said.

His former colleagues in Nicollet, North Mankato and St. Peter have a combined 60 years of experience. “I have pretty good knowledge behind me,” he said.

They already have given him some good advice, such as don’t live in the same city in which you work. This tactic makes it possible for a city clerk to separate his or her work life from personal life.

Rosin’s previous city clerk experience has given him working knowledge of city clerking in a small city like Loretto. So he has set gaining familiarity with Loretto issues as one of his first tasks.

Being a city clerk requires education outside of a college or university. Rosin completed new clerk training in 2008-09. He plans to begin three years of certified city clerk training this spring. The training will be through the Minnesota Clerks and Finance Officers Association.

About his future, Rosin said, “I want to be here and be successful as long as I can.”

He is looking forward to continuing his traditional fishing trips with his father in the St. Peter area. Once he knows about area fishing spots, such as Lakes Sarah and Independence, he will have even more places in which to cast a line.

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