Champlin allows auto electronics installation business

Housekeeping items round out Nov. 26 council meeting

After conducting the flag processional, Boy Scout Anthony Noe, 13, of Champlin, salutes the flag as he leads the council and others in council chambers in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. (Photo by Mindy Mateuszczyk)

After conducting the flag processional, Boy Scout Anthony Noe, 13, of Champlin, salutes the flag as he leads the council and others in council chambers in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. (Photo by Mindy Mateuszczyk)

City staff brought back an ongoing effort directed by staff to find a way to allow Jeremy Jacobson to conduct an automobile electronics installation and service business at a property he is leasing. The property, located at 12322 Business Park Boulevard is zoned C-2, a zoning category that does not permit auto-related uses.

However, at their Monday, Nov. 26 meeting the council approved a resolution to utilize a planned unit development (PUD) overlay zone on an interim basis as the proposed business met certain criteria.

One question council wanted staff to answer was whether or not the uses of the property would be appropriate for the Highway 169 corridor. Staff concluded the business would not impact the existing building or site conditions with the exception of minor landscape improvements and restriping in the parking lot. The business does not require underground storage tanks and will not emit and offensive odors or sounds with all the activity conducted internally.

Local Boy Scout Troop 276 present the colors at the Champlin City Council meeting Monday, Nov. 26. Kenton Horbal carries the U.S. Flag, Kyle Koch carries the state flag while (unseen) Ryan Slomkowski carries the City of Champlin’s flag. All three Boys Scouts reside in Champlin. (Photo by Mindy Mateuszczyk)

Local Boy Scout Troop 276 present the colors at the Champlin City Council meeting Monday, Nov. 26. Kenton Horbal carries the U.S. Flag, Kyle Koch carries the state flag while (unseen) Ryan Slomkowski carries the City of Champlin’s flag. All three Boys Scouts reside in Champlin. (Photo by Mindy Mateuszczyk)

The PUD allows for signage on the western façade of the building limited to 40 square feet.

Another concern council wanted address was to explore what the impact of the rezoning would have on the future of the area. With the adjacent properties potentially eligible for redevelopment at some point the recommendation to council came with a five-year sunset date on the PUD.

According to the report prepared by City Planner Scott Schulte, five years provides an opportunity for the business to establish itself in the community and potentially relocate to an appropriately zoned site large enough to support expansion. The sunset date may be extended with city council approval. Further, the PUD shall limit the site’s use to that requested. Additionally, it is non-transferable to another individual.

 

In other action, council:

APPROVED — A resolution inserting the Mississippi Crossings redevelopment framework plan into the comprehensive plan. This process includes submitting the plan to neighboring cities and including their comments in a package sent to Metropolitan Council for review.

APPROVED — a resolution to split the city owned lot at 11824 Winnetka Avenue. The northern portion of the lot has been used to create a stormwater pond with the expectation it will be integrated into a ditch system to treat storm water with the future reconstruction of the road. The remaining southern acreage will be split into a separate lot to be marketed and sold as a single-family residential lot.

APPROVED — professional engineering services agreement with WSB and Associates for a water system model that will analyze the efficiency and functionality of the city’s water distribution system. The city hasn’t completed a model since 1995. There has been significant growth in the city since then. Additionally, the proposed redevelopment of the Mississippi Crossings area is a significant factor in choosing to conduct the model now to determine if there is adequate supply to that area for the proposed multi-family homes and other commercial and residential plans. The water model will provide insight for the city’s entire water system.

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